All posts in Corporate Culture

15 Principles of Agile Social Business Projects

15 Principles of Agile Social Business Projects:

1. Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable social business solutions.
2. Welcome changing requirements, even late in the delivery lifecycle. Agile processes harness change for the stakeholders’ competitive advantage.
3. Deliver working solutions frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale.
4. Stakeholders and developers must work together daily throughout the project.
5. Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done.
6. The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a delivery team is face-to-face conversation.

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Culture Is Key For Social Business Success

Culture. Culture is how an organization makes sense of the world, a set of assumptions internalized by all its members. Most organizations are the cultural equivalent of stone age tribes: focused on “the hunt,” “the kill,” and what’s for dinner today. Like stone age tribes, they’re fractious, unproductive, and easily broken. In the culture strategy, social tools are used to help an organization make better sense of the world. Accountability, roles, tasks, processes and incentives shape culture. In the culture strategy, social tools are utilized to reconceive them. Wal-Mart’s Sustainability Index is a radical example of a culture-changer, altering all of the above, helping Wal-Mart’s entire ecosystem make sense of the world anew.

Many organizations are struggling with the changes impacting their workforce. Whether it is shifts in age demographics, talent building and retention, or leveraging Web 2.0, there is an air of desperation for clarity. C7group offers a comprehensive approach that shows business leaders and human resources professionals how to leverage the power of social media tools to build a truly connected global workforce.

The C7group is named for our model for the social business culture of tomorrow. A mathematical model for cyclical group behavior  – C7 is the model for a business culture that is adaptive. Our serendipitous coincidence was the identification of lots of things that began with “C” that have a profound effect on the success of social business initiatives. Some of the C’s include collaboration, costs and cycles, customer service, centralized intellectual property and competitive advantage. We believe if an organization get’s all the “C”s working together in a way that embraces change, they can truly make the radical shift to 21st century sustainable success. Culture or Ideology, we think is the most important when it comes to the success of social business initiatives in large organizations.

” In my view, the successful companies of the future will be those that integrate business and employees’ personal values. The best people want to do work that contributes to society, with a company whose values they share, where their actions count and their views matter.” – Jeroen van der Veer, Chief Executive, Royal Dutch Shell (2009)

As a result of massive doses of external constraints on business, the past two decades have seen a trend in many U.S. companies from aggressive, tough-minded fast movers, with confident independent middle managers, to much more procedure-bound and uncertain or slow-acting bureaucracies. Decisions of importance must now conform to volumes of policy manuals and be ratified by increasing numbers of specialist staff people, particularly legal and accounting staff. Clearly this bureaucratic strangulation leaves much to be desired. To hamstring middle management by imposing layer upon layer of caveats and internal regulations, and by requiring that their decisions be ratified by burgeoning hierarchies of staff specialists, serves only to slow managers’ response times, destroy their initiative, and demotivate those that have any aggressiveness at all. Equally clear, for a company’s middle managers to build and maintain momentum, they need to be able to act autonomously and confidently, yet at the same time there is a need for them to act in ways that are appropriate for the overall company they represent.

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