All posts in Social Business

IBM Case Study: A Lesson In Social Business Transformation | Social Media Blog by Michael Brito

What advice can you give to other executives who want to transform their organizations into a fully collaborative social business?

We’ve learned many valuable lessons along our social business transformation journey. One of the biggest lessons learned was that social business transformation involves more changes to culture than technology. Remember that your employees are your most important asset. Shift your focus from documents, project plans and other temporary artifacts to the source of the energy, creativity and decision making that moves the business forward: people. Remember that trust is a key element to becoming a social business. An organization needs a certain level of trust to empower its employees to share their ideas and expertise and it must demonstrate this trust by rewarding behavior. At the same time, this trust must be balanced with an appropriate level of governance or discipline that sets the parameters of appropriate actions. Lastly, becoming a social business is not simply a matter of deploying some collaboration tools and hoping for the best. It is a long-term strategic approach to shaping a business culture and is highly dependent on executive leadership and effective corporate strategy, including business processes, risk management, leadership development, financial controls and business analytics.

via IBM Case Study: A Lesson In Social Business Transformation | Social Media Blog by Michael Brito.

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Jive What Matters [Video]

With the release of the latest Jive 5 social business platform, Jive have made it faster and easier for end users to learn what’s happening around their community and find information and resources that matter most.

This is definitely one of the major selling points of the new Jive 5 platform. Reducing the amount of noise and not leaving end users with information overload or that “did I leave the gas on?” feeling that you are missing out on important information about your job.

The Activity stream of What Matters is where you can stay apprised and engaged in activity happening in our community. For example, it will track activity related to content you are following, people you are following as well as places you are following.

Jive 5 allows users to find your most important updates, intelligently filtered, based on rich social information. You can personalize your stream even more by hiding things you don’t want to see.

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On Social Media Becoming Social Business – David Armano – Harvard Business Review

We are entering an age of social business: a purposeful, planned, orchestrated, and integrated way of doing business in a social context which may feel personal to the outside world but combine complexities internally within organizations that will need navigating. As further evidence to the shift, one can look to technology for yet another clue.

Over the past several years, forward-thinking companies have begun to understand the value of monitoring conversations, so they have purchased software licenses from platforms like Radian 6. Recently, Enterprise software behemoth Salesforce acquired the startup, sending the signal that listening to social conversations is only one slice of the bigger pie for business. The true opportunity lies in scaling and operationalizing “social”. If the next phase of social media is operating as a scalable social organization or business, then expect to see an explosion of activity in the following areas:

via On Social Media Becoming Social Business – David Armano – Harvard Business Review.

If you haven’t read this article please do so before continuing to read this post. David is a thought leader in the social media space. We have to thank David for validating our business model with his post.

He highlights 3 areas of focus:

  1. Organizational Design – a social business is redesigned as it moves through key phases of its evolution. All business functions have to undergo several iterations of change. Looking at your organization from a social business lens means looking at it more holistically.
  2. Social Business Intelligence: The rise of social media led to a gold rush in technology solutions, which allowed organizations to eavesdrop on conversations happening across multiple social ecosystems and digital public spaces such as the blogosphere, message boards, and Facebook.
  3. Cultures of Collaboration, Co-Creation & Shared Value – The end result is what’s commonly known in the business world as an ecosystem in which value is entered into it and extracted by multiple stakeholders for mutual gain. An ecosystem, by definition, is sustainable.

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15 Principles of Agile Social Business Projects

15 Principles of Agile Social Business Projects:

1. Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable social business solutions.
2. Welcome changing requirements, even late in the delivery lifecycle. Agile processes harness change for the stakeholders’ competitive advantage.
3. Deliver working solutions frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale.
4. Stakeholders and developers must work together daily throughout the project.
5. Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done.
6. The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a delivery team is face-to-face conversation.

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Culture Is Key For Social Business Success

Culture. Culture is how an organization makes sense of the world, a set of assumptions internalized by all its members. Most organizations are the cultural equivalent of stone age tribes: focused on “the hunt,” “the kill,” and what’s for dinner today. Like stone age tribes, they’re fractious, unproductive, and easily broken. In the culture strategy, social tools are used to help an organization make better sense of the world. Accountability, roles, tasks, processes and incentives shape culture. In the culture strategy, social tools are utilized to reconceive them. Wal-Mart’s Sustainability Index is a radical example of a culture-changer, altering all of the above, helping Wal-Mart’s entire ecosystem make sense of the world anew.

Many organizations are struggling with the changes impacting their workforce. Whether it is shifts in age demographics, talent building and retention, or leveraging Web 2.0, there is an air of desperation for clarity. C7group offers a comprehensive approach that shows business leaders and human resources professionals how to leverage the power of social media tools to build a truly connected global workforce.

The C7group is named for our model for the social business culture of tomorrow. A mathematical model for cyclical group behavior  – C7 is the model for a business culture that is adaptive. Our serendipitous coincidence was the identification of lots of things that began with “C” that have a profound effect on the success of social business initiatives. Some of the C’s include collaboration, costs and cycles, customer service, centralized intellectual property and competitive advantage. We believe if an organization get’s all the “C”s working together in a way that embraces change, they can truly make the radical shift to 21st century sustainable success. Culture or Ideology, we think is the most important when it comes to the success of social business initiatives in large organizations.

” In my view, the successful companies of the future will be those that integrate business and employees’ personal values. The best people want to do work that contributes to society, with a company whose values they share, where their actions count and their views matter.” – Jeroen van der Veer, Chief Executive, Royal Dutch Shell (2009)

As a result of massive doses of external constraints on business, the past two decades have seen a trend in many U.S. companies from aggressive, tough-minded fast movers, with confident independent middle managers, to much more procedure-bound and uncertain or slow-acting bureaucracies. Decisions of importance must now conform to volumes of policy manuals and be ratified by increasing numbers of specialist staff people, particularly legal and accounting staff. Clearly this bureaucratic strangulation leaves much to be desired. To hamstring middle management by imposing layer upon layer of caveats and internal regulations, and by requiring that their decisions be ratified by burgeoning hierarchies of staff specialists, serves only to slow managers’ response times, destroy their initiative, and demotivate those that have any aggressiveness at all. Equally clear, for a company’s middle managers to build and maintain momentum, they need to be able to act autonomously and confidently, yet at the same time there is a need for them to act in ways that are appropriate for the overall company they represent.

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